Pier 6
RFP Submission
Proposed development of two residential buildings in Brooklyn Bridge Park, with Phipps Houses owning the affordable units and Phipps Neighborhoods running a Universal Pre-Kindergarten on the ground floor.
Architect
Selldorf Architects


Partner
Phipps Houses
The vestiges of industrial Brooklyn are simple yet elegant, ordered by a regular rhythm of windows, articulated with grid-like compositions, and enlivened by the tactility and craftsmanship of concrete and steel.
The vestiges of industrial Brooklyn are simple yet elegant, ordered by a regular rhythm of windows, articulated with grid-like compositions, and enlivened by the tactility and craftsmanship of concrete and steel.
The two buildings are designed as a single, unified complex united by a common architectural language and material palette.
OVERVIEW

The proposal includes two buildings in Brooklyn Bridge Park. 1 Atlantic was designed as a 29-story building with 120 market-rate residential units totaling approximately 268,000 gross square feet. The building was to include amenities, such as a gym and community room, made available to residents of both buildings. 3 Atlantic was designed as a 17-story building with 156 affordable rental units and 15 market rate condominiums totaling nearly 174,000 gross square feet. A Universal Pre-Kindergarten operated by Phipps Neighborhoods was proposed at the ground floor.

The two buildings are designed as a single, unified complex united by a common architectural language and material palette.
As the last parcel for a major architectural project in Brooklyn Bridge Park, the concept was matured with a sensitivity to the area’s culture, architecture, politics and storied past, while utilizing technology and innovation to accomplish economic efficiencies.
Building bases lift to integrate park landscape into the design.
The architecture creates a scaled intimacy that engages the community instead of competing with it.
Context is not merely aesthetic; it is equally described by the Park’s informal spirit, inclusive community feel, and commitment to environmental conservation.
Public areas are shaded by the inviting curvature of the buildings’ cantilevered bases, a design element that evokes the promenade and expressway’s sloping overhangs.
Both buildings embrace the Park, welcoming visitors with transparency, public amenities, and shaded outdoor spaces for relaxation and play.
The design transitions from the solidity of concrete to ephemeral glass, creating a lighter and more transparent impression along the skyline, along with opportunities to enjoy expansive views.